Novak Djokovic: Criminal defence lawyer spots embarrassing error in legal documents


Glamorous lawyer spots an embarrassing error in Novak Djokovic’s legal documents – but he STILL won the case

  • Queensland lawyer and Bachelor contestant spots major error in legal document
  • Papers submitted on Novak Djokovic’s behalf had spelt his last name ‘Djokavic’
  • Comes as player won his case in the Federal Court to play in the Australian Open
  • Federal government suggested it might still try to have Djokovic’s visa cancelled 
  • Government lawyers submitted the unvaccinated star was a health risk to others
  • The tennis star took to social media to thank fans for their dedicated support 


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A criminal defence lawyer and former Bachelor contestant has spotted a glaring error in one of Novak Djokovic‘s legal documents. 

The tennis champion was freed from five days of immigration detention on Monday after his army of legal representatives fronted the Federal Court in Melbourne.  

Judge Anthony Kelly ordered freed the 34-year-old be freed from detention at the Park Hotel – sparking wild scenes on the city streets.

But while the world No.1 had a winning case, it wasn’t foolproof – with closer inspection of an injunction submitted on behalf of by lawyers from firm Hall & Willcox showing his name was spelt incorrectly.

The tennis champion has been freed from five days of immigration detention on Monday, after his army of legal representatives fronted Federal Court in Melbourne

The tennis champion has been freed from five days of immigration detention on Monday, after his army of legal representatives fronted Federal Court in Melbourne

The tennis champion has been freed from five days of immigration detention on Monday, after his army of legal representatives fronted Federal Court in Melbourne

On closer inspection of an injunction submitted on behalf of the player by lawyers from firm Hall & Wilcox, a glaring error has been revealed (pictured)

On closer inspection of an injunction submitted on behalf of the player by lawyers from firm Hall & Wilcox, a glaring error has been revealed (pictured)

On closer inspection of an injunction submitted on behalf of the player by lawyers from firm Hall & Wilcox, a glaring error has been revealed (pictured)

Under the section ‘Filed on behalf of’, the document spelt the tennis star’s name Novak ‘Djokovac’. 

Lawyer Belinda Robinson posted a screenshot of the legal document on social media overnight. 

The reality TV star captioned the image: ‘When u forget what your highest profile clients name is’.

The blunder comes as Djokovic is finally allowed to begin his Australian Open campaign, hitting the courts at Melbourne’s Rod Laver overnight. 

Djokovic last night broke his silence over the Australian government’s failed attempt to cancel his visa, saying he still wants to compete at the Australian Open next week.

Criminal defence lawyer Belinda Robinson posted the legal document on her Instagram Story with the caption: 'When you forget what your highest profile clients name is'

Criminal defence lawyer Belinda Robinson posted the legal document on her Instagram Story with the caption: 'When you forget what your highest profile clients name is'

Criminal defence lawyer Belinda Robinson posted the legal document on her Instagram Story with the caption: ‘When you forget what your highest profile clients name is’

After days of uncertainty, the tennis legend broke his silence over the Australian government's failed attempt to cancel his visa (pictured)

After days of uncertainty, the tennis legend broke his silence over the Australian government's failed attempt to cancel his visa (pictured)

After days of uncertainty, the tennis legend broke his silence over the Australian government’s failed attempt to cancel his visa (pictured)

‘I’m pleased and grateful that the judge overturned my visa cancellation. Despite all that has happened, I want to stay and try to compete,’ he said on Twitter, alongside a picture of himself practicing late on Monday night.

‘I remain focused on that. I flew here to play at one of the most important events we have in front of the amazing fans.’

But Djokovic still doesn’t know for certain if he can compete in the Australian Open and nor does anyone else, least of all it seems, the Australian government.

The Immigration Minister has refused to rule out using his powers to cancel the 20-time Grand Slam winner’s visa yet again. 

Despite there being a four-hour window after Monday’s ruling to make the controversial move it has since emerged that the minister could opt to use a different set of powers on Tuesday. 

Djokovic’s visa for Australia was cancelled due to an apparent issue with his Covid vaccination exemption prompting five days of chaotic bureaucracy between the Australian federal government, the Victorian state government, the Serbian government and Tennis Australia. 

Judge Kelly quashed the decision to tear up Djokovic’s visa and ordered that all his personal belongings be returned, saying: ‘What more could this man have done?’ 

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT NOVAK DJOKOVIC’S CASE

Will Novak Djokovic play at the Australian Open? Nobody will know until the Minister for Immigration Alex Hawke declares his hand – either to allow Djokovic to stay in Australia or to re-cancel his visa.

If he does not decide to cancel his visa, Djokovic will be free to stay in Australia and defend his title.

What happened in court? Judge Anthony Kelly quashed the decision to tear up Djokovic’s visa and ordered him to be freed and his belongings to be returned.

Will he still be deported? Again, this comes down to immigration minister Alex Hawke. The Djokovic case has been a debacle for the government and divided Australians over the best course of action.

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Judge Kelly quashed the decision to tear up Djokovic's visa and ordered that all his personal belongings be returned, saying: 'What more could this man have done?'

Judge Kelly quashed the decision to tear up Djokovic's visa and ordered that all his personal belongings be returned, saying: 'What more could this man have done?'

Judge Kelly quashed the decision to tear up Djokovic’s visa and ordered that all his personal belongings be returned, saying: ‘What more could this man have done?’

The decision is a huge blow to the Department of Home Affairs which had claimed Djokovic had relied on out-of-date ATAGI advice to enter the country. 

But Christopher Tran, who was leading the government’s case, warned immigration minister Alex Hawke may still use his personal power to revoke Djokovic’s visa – a decision that would almost certainly land the parties back in court.

Djokovic is free to enter Australia and compete at the Open – which starts on January 17 – where he will bid to become the most-decorated men’s singles player of all time. 

It comes as the player’s signed affidavit has offered a detailed account of his ordeal during an interrogation by border officials, leaving him ‘upset and confused’.

The world No.1 was made to sleep on a couch in between questioning after touching down in Melbourne about 11.30pm on Wednesday. 

He’d already spent 25 hours in transit and was astounded to learn his medical exemption was not considered satisfactory, saying he genuinely believed he had done all that was required.

Djokovic told the court he ‘did not understand what was happening’ or why they would consider cancelling his visa and repeatedly pleaded with officials to allow him time to consult his legal team when they woke up.

The player's signed affidavit has offered a detailed account of his ordeal during an interrogation by border officials, leaving him 'upset and confused' (pictured, fans pray for the player outside the Park Hotel in Melbourne)

The player's signed affidavit has offered a detailed account of his ordeal during an interrogation by border officials, leaving him 'upset and confused' (pictured, fans pray for the player outside the Park Hotel in Melbourne)

The player’s signed affidavit has offered a detailed account of his ordeal during an interrogation by border officials, leaving him ‘upset and confused’ (pictured, fans pray for the player outside the Park Hotel in Melbourne)

By 12.20am, Border Force officials were ready to commence a formal interview with the Serbian star, demanding all documentation relating to the medical exemption.

Djokovic handed over the same documents he’d already provided, including his medical exemption letter from Tennis Australia and correspondence with the Department of Home Affairs indicating he’d met requirements to travel.

‘I was asked whether I had been previously infected by Covid. I told him that I had been infected twice… the most recent occasion being December 2021.’

Djokovic said in his affidavit he was happy to oblige because he recognised that the issue was his vaccination status, and wanted to reassure the officials he’d taken all the precautions to ensure he was fit to travel.

That is why I wanted him to see the COVID-PCR test results, but I recall he did not appear to be very interested in these documents,’ Djokovic recalled.

Djokovic is free to enter Australia and compete at the Open - which starts on January 17 - where he will bid to become the most-decorated men's singles player of all time

Djokovic is free to enter Australia and compete at the Open - which starts on January 17 - where he will bid to become the most-decorated men's singles player of all time

Djokovic is free to enter Australia and compete at the Open – which starts on January 17 – where he will bid to become the most-decorated men’s singles player of all time

After a 90 minute interrogation, it was determined there was ‘nothing else Djokovic could provide’ and he was permitted to ‘go into the corridor to rest on the sofa’.

He was woken about 4am with a document notifying him of the intention to ‘consider cancellation of [his] visa’.

Djokovic immediately attempted to reason with the officers, telling them that he’d received advice from the Independent State Government medical panel which explicitly stated his recent Covid infection was grounds for exemption.

‘He told me he was giving me 20 or so minutes to respond, give comments or give any other information that may affect their decision whether to cancel my visa.’

This decision would eventually be the critical reason Djokovic was successful in his appeal on Monday.

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